Post OSHA Injury and Illness Data February 1, Get Ready for Electronic Submission

January 30, 2017

Most employers with more than 10 employees are required to keep a record of serious work-related injuries and illnesses. Injuries at some low risk industries, and minor injuries requiring first aid only do not need to be recorded.

The following are examples of injuries that must be recorded:

  • Any work-related fatality
  • Any work-related injury or illness that results in loss of consciousness, days away from work, restricted work, or transfer to another job
  • Any work-related injury or illness requiring medical treatment beyond first aid
  • Any work-related diagnosed case of cancer, chronic irreversible diseases, fractured or cracked bones or teeth, and punctured eardrums
  • There are also special recording criteria for work-related cases involving: needlesticks and sharps injuries, medical removal, hearing loss, and tuberculosis

Examples of minor first aide injuries that don’t need to be recorded include:

  • Using a non-prescription medication at nonprescription strength (for medications available in both prescription and non-prescription form, a recommendation by a physician or other licensed health care professional to use a non-prescription medication at prescription strength is considered medical treatment for recordkeeping purposes)
  • Administering tetanus immunizations (other immunizations, such as Hepatitis B vaccine or rabies vaccine, are considered medical treatment); Cleaning, flushing or soaking wounds on the surface of the skin
  • Using wound coverings such as bandages, Band-Aids™, gauze pads, etc.; or using butterfly bandages or Steri-Strips™ (other wound closing devices such as sutures, staples, etc., are considered medical treatment)
  • Using hot or cold therapy
  • Using any non-rigid means of support, such as elastic bandages, wraps, non-rigid back belts, etc. (devices with rigid stays or other systems designed to immobilize parts of the body are considered medical treatment for recordkeeping purposes)
  • Using temporary immobilization devices while transporting an accident victim (e.g., splints, slings, neck collars, back boards, etc.). Drilling of a fingernail or toenail to relieve pressure, or draining fluid from a blister
  • Using eye patches
  • Removing foreign bodies from the eye using only irrigation or a cotton swab
  • Removing splinters or foreign material from areas other than the eye by irrigation, tweezers, cotton swabs, or other simple means
  • Using finger guards
  • Using massages (physical therapy or chiropractic treatment are considered medical treatment for recordkeeping purposes)
  • Drinking fluids for relief of heat stress

Records on recordable injuries must be maintained at the worksite for at least five years. Each February through April, employers must post a summary (Form 300A or equivalent) of the injuries and illnesses recorded the previous year. Also, if requested, copies of the records must be provided to current and former employees, or their representatives.

Starting in this year, many employers will be required to electronically submit the summary of injuries and illnesses to OSHA. Analysis of this data will enable OSHA to use its enforcement and compliance assistance resources more efficiently. Some of the data will also be posted to the OSHA website. OSHA believes that public disclosure will encourage employers to improve workplace safety and provide valuable information to workers, job seekers, customers, researchers, and the general public. The amount of data submitted will vary depending on the size of company and type of industry.

OSHA will provide a secure website that offers three options for data submission. First, users will be able to manually enter data into a web form. Second, users will be able to upload a CSV file to process single or multiple establishments at the same time. Last, users of automated recordkeeping systems will have the ability to transmit data electronically via an API (application programming interface). The site is scheduled to go live in February, and should be available at this link.

In addition to the posting requirement, OSHA updated its recordkeeping rule to expand the list of severe injuries that employers must report directly to OSHA, regardless of the above exemptions.

Currently, all employers must report:

  • All work-related fatalities within 8 hours
  • All work-related in-patient hospitalizations, all amputations, and all losses of an eye within 24 hours

You can report to OSHA by:

  • Calling OSHA's free and confidential number at 1-800-321-OSHA (6742)
  • Calling your closest Area Office during normal business hours
  • Using the new online form

Tampa RCRA and DOT Training

Register for Hazardous Waste Management: The Complete Course and DOT Hazardous Materials Training: The Complete Course in Tampa, FL, on February 7–9 and save $100. To take advantage of this offer, click here or call 800-537-2372.

Dallas RCRA and DOT Training

Register for Hazardous Waste Management in Texas and DOT Hazardous Materials Training: The Complete Course in Dallas, TX, on February 14–16 and save $100. To take advantage of this offer, click here or call 800-537-2372.

Chicago RCRA, DOT, and IATA Training

Register for Hazardous Waste Management: The Complete Course and DOT Hazardous Materials Training: The Complete Course in Chicago, IL, on February 14–February 16. If you ship dangerous goods by air, get your required training at Transportation of Dangerous Goods: Compliance with IATA Regulations on February 17. To take advantage of these offers, click here or call 800-537-2372.

Pertuzumab and Vismodegib Listed as Reproductive Toxins

Effective January 27, 2017, California’s Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment (OEHHA) is adding Pertuzumab (CAS No. 380610-27-5) to the list of chemicals known to the state to cause reproductive toxicity and Vismodegib (CAS No. 879085-55-9) to the list of chemicals known to the state to cause reproductive toxicity, for purposes of Proposition 65.

The listing of pertuzumab and vismodegib is based on a formal requirement by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) that the chemicals be identified or labeled as causing reproductive toxicity. Pertuzumab has been identified or labeled to communicate a risk of reproductive harm (developmental endpoint) in accordance with formal FDA requirements. Vismodegib has been identified or labeled to communicate a risk of reproductive harm (developmental, female, and male endpoints) in accordance with formal FDA requirements. Regulations governing the listing of chemicals under the “formally required to be labeled or identified” mechanism are published in Title 27, California Code of Regulations, section 25902.

The documentation supporting OEHHA’s determination that pertuzumab meets the criteria for listing is included in the Notice of Intent to List Pertuzumab posted on OEHHA’s website and published in the December 2, 2016 issue of the California Regulatory Notice Register (Register 2016, No. 49-Z). No public comments were received.

The documentation supporting OEHHA’s determination that vismodegib meets the criteria for listing is included in the Notice of Intent to List Vismodegib posted on OEHHA’s website and in the December 2, 2016, issue of the California Regulatory Notice Register (Register 2016, No. 49-Z). No public comments were received.

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