What's on EPA's Agenda for Next Year?

November 07, 2005
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EPA recently released its regulatory agenda, which summarizes the rules that are in progress. The following are some of the regulations in progress under the Resource Conservation & Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Emergency Planning and Community Right to Know Act.á WeÆll listing pending regulations in other programs in future Environmental Resource Center Tips of the Week.
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Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA)
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  • áááááááá Standards for the Management of Coal Combustion Wastes Generated by Commercial Electric Power Producers
  • áááááááá Increase Metals Reclamation From F006 Waste Streams
  • áááááááá Revisions for Transboundary Shipments of Hazardous Waste for Recovery
  • áááááááá Within the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development
  • áááááááá Hazardous Waste Management System: Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste (F019 Listing Amendment in Wastewater Treatment Sludges From Zinc Phosphating Processes in Automotive Assembly Plants)
  • áááááááá Rulemaking to Streamline Laboratory Waste Management in Academic and Research Laboratories
  • áááááááá Expanding the Comparable Fuels Exclusion Under RCRA
  • áááááááá Criteria for Safe and Environmentally Protective Use of Granular Mine Tailings
  • áááááááá Incentives for Performance Track Members
  • áááááááá Revisions to the Comprehensive Guideline for Procurement of Products Containing Recovered Materials
  • áááááááá RCRA Burden Reduction Initiative
  • áááááááá Regulation of Hazardous Oil-Bearing Secondary Materials from Petroleum Refining Industry and Other Hazardous Secondary Materials Processed in a Gasification System to Produce Synthesis Gas
  • áááááááá Modifications to RCRA Rules Associated with Solvent-Contaminated Industrial Wipes
  • áááááááá Recycling of Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs): Changes to Hazardous Waste Regulations
  • áááááááá Revisions to the Definition of Solid Waste
  • áááááááá Project XL Site-Specific Rulemaking for the IBM Semiconductor Manufacturing Facility in Hopewell Junction, New York
  • áááááááá Management of Cement Kiln Dust
  • áááááááá Standards for the Management of Coal Combustion Wastes--Non-Power Producers and Minefilling
  • áááááááá Revisions to Solid Waste Landfill Criteria--Leachate Recirculation on Alternative Liners
  • áááááááá RCRA Smarter Waste Reporting
  • áááááááá E-Cycling Pilot Project for Region 3 States (ECOS); Streamlining RCRA Regulations To Encourage Reuse, Recycling, and Recovery of Electronic Equipment
  • áááááááá Final Determination of the Applicability of the Toxicity Characteristic Rule to Petroleum Contaminated Media and Debris From Underground Storage Tanks
  • áááááááá Hazardous Waste Generator Program Evaluation
  • áááááááá RCRA Subtitle C Financial Test Criteria
  • áááááááá Revisions of the Lead-Acid Battery Export Notification and Consent Requirements
  • áááááááá Hazardous Waste Manifest Revisions--Standards and Procedures for Electronic Manifests
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To learn more about how to comply with RCRA, attend Environmental Resource CenterÆs Hazardous Waste Management training.
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Emergency Planning and Community Right to Know Act (EPCRA û SARA Title III)
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  • áááááááá Emergency Planning and Community Right-To-Know Act: Modification to the Threshold Planning Quantity Methodology for the Extremely Hazardous Substances That Are Solids in Solution
  • áááááááá Toxics Release Inventory Reporting Burden Reduction Rule
  • áááááááá TRI; Response to Petition to Delete Chromium, Antimony, Titanate from the Metal Compound Categories Listed on the Toxics Release Inventory
  • áááááááá TRI; Response to Petition to Delete Acetonitrile from the Toxics Release Inventory List of Toxic Chemicals
  • áááááááá Rulemaking to Change Toxic Release Inventory (TRI) Reporting Requirements from Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) Codes to North American Industrial Classification System (NAICS) Codes
  • áááááááá Addition of Toxicity Equivalency (TEQ) Reporting and Quantity Data for Individual Members of the Dioxin and Dioxin-Like Compounds Category Under EPCRA, Section 313
  • áááááááá Emergency Planning and Community Right-To-Know Act: Amendments and Streamlining Rule
  • áááááááá Clarify TRI Reporting Obligations Under EPCRA Section 313 for the Metal Mining Activities of Extraction and Beneficiation
  • áááááááá TRI; Response to Petition To Add Diisononyl Phthalate to the Toxics Release Inventory List of Toxic Chemicals
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To learn more about EPCRA, attend Environmental Resource CenterÆs SARA Title III Workshop.
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Small Quantity Generator Penalized $270,000 for Storing Hazardous Waste without a Permit

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EPA Region 5 filed an administrative complaint against TWF Industries Inc., Barrett, Minn., for alleged violations of federal and state rules on the management of hazardous waste. A $270,700 penalty is proposed.
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TWF was storing hazardous chromium waste without a permit at its 415 Second St. metal finishing facility. As a small quantity generator, TWF is allowed to store hazardous waste at its facility for up to 180 days without a permit. EPA inspectors determined that TWF kept waste for 363 days.
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Life Cycle of a Soccer Ball

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Life Cycle Analysis of the products you manufacture will help you determine the impact of the product on the environment, not only as you manufacture it, as it is used and ultimately disposed of.á As with any product, making a soccer ball uses natural resources and energy, which can impact the air, land, and water. Perhaps to make kids aware of the life cycle of products that they use, EPA recently released a report on the life cycle of a soccer ball.
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Wal-Mart Settles Clean Air Violations with Campaign to Reduce Diesel Pollution

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As part of a settlement for clean air violations, Wal-Mart Stores Inc. will undertake a national effort to reduce diesel truck idling at its 4,000 facilities across the U.S. The anti-idling project results from a clean air enforcement action in Massachusetts and Connecticut brought by EPAÆs New England regional office.
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The settlement will result in Wal-Mart taking action across the country to address truck idling, by training Wal-Mart drivers, posting signs at all Wal-Mart facilities, and notifying other delivery companies of Wal-MartÆs policy to prohibit idling. Under the consent agreement, Wal-Mart will also pay a $50,000 penalty.
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EPAÆs complaint that trucks were illegally idling at Wal-Mart stores in Massachusetts and Connecticut is the countryÆs first multi-state case that addresses idling violations. ôDiesel pollution is a serious problem across the country, especially for those suffering from asthma or other health problemsö said Robert W. Varney, regional administrator of EPAÆs New England office. ôWe are pleased that Wal-Mart is implementing these aggressive measures to limit idling and help make Wal-Mart stores across the nation healthier places for employees, customers, and the surrounding communities.ö
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Running a vehicleÆs engine while it is stopped (known as idling) wastes fuel and creates air pollution. Exhaust from diesel engines includes small particles, known as fine particulate matter, and smog-forming pollutants. Fine particles pose a serious health risk because they can easily pass through the nose and throat and lodge themselves deep in the lungs. When inhaled repeatedly, the pollutants in diesel exhaust may aggravate asthma and allergies or cause other serious health problems including lung cancer.
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A typical idling truck burns nearly a gallon of fuel per hour. A fleet of 7,000 trucks, about the size of Wal-MartÆs fleet, idling for one hour a day would burn 2.1 million gallons of diesel fuel each year, and create 415 tons of smog-forming pollutants, 10 tons of harmful particulate matter, and 23,000 tons of carbon dioxide, which contributes to global climate change.
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In fall 2004, EPA inspectors observed trucks owned by Wal-Mart and by other trucking companies idling for long periods of time at six different Wal-Mart properties in Connecticut and Massachusetts. Inspectors observed delivery vehicles idling during the day as well as sleeper cabs idling at night.
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Both Connecticut and Massachusetts have anti-idling rules that are included in the ôstate implementation plansö that states submit to EPA outlining how they will meet national air quality standards. Regulations in the state implementation plan are enforceable by the state and by EPA. The Massachusetts rule prohibits vehicle idling over five minutes (with exceptions for periods of traffic, repairs, or operation of loading or refrigeration equipment). The Connecticut rule prohibits vehicle idling for over three minutes when temperatures are above 20 degrees Fahrenheit, with exceptions for traffic conditions, repairs, etc.
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Under the terms of the settlement, Wal-Mart will comply with all federally-enforceable idling rules. In addition, through a supplemental environmental project, Wal-Mart has agreed to include all facilities in all states in its idle reduction program regardless of whether the state has an anti-idling regulation. Specifically, Wal-Mart will post ôno idlingö signs at all Wal-Mart facilities in all states, and notify other delivery companies that idling is not permitted on Wal-Mart property and may violate state or local idling restrictions. Finally, Wal-Mart will pay a $50,000 penalty.
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A number of states and localities have anti-idling restrictions in place. The states with anti-idling restrictions include all or part of Arizona, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Georgia, Hawaii, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Missouri, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Texas, Utah and Virginia. Several states (including Massachusetts, Connecticut, Virginia, New Jersey, Hawaii and portions of Texas), have included these idling restrictions in their state implementation plan, making those rules federally-enforceable. Municipal governments that have developed anti-idling requirements to attain cleaner air include Maricopa County, AZ; Denver, CO; District of Columbia; Atlanta, GA; Owatonna and St. Cloud, MN; St. Louis, MO; Clark County and Washoe County, NV; New York City, NY; Allegheny County and Philadelphia, PA; Brazoria County, Chambers County, Fort Bend County, Galveston County, Harris County, Liberty County, Montgomery County and Waller County, TX; Salt Lake County, UT.
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This EPA action follows several previous enforcement efforts to reduce illegal idling, including a settlement with the Massachusetts Bay Transit Authority in March 2004, settlements with several bus companies in 2002 regarding illegal idling at Logan Airport in Boston, and a January 2005 settlement with a North Andover, Massachusetts company.
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Several idle control technologies can aid fleets in limiting idling time and complying with state regulations. Automatic shut-down devices can switch off parked trucks after predetermined time intervals. Auxiliary Power Units (APUs) û which typically only consume between 0.05 and 0.2 gallons of fuel per hour û can provide heat, air conditioning, and power without running the main engine. Trucks can be fitted with devices that allow them to plug into electrical outlets to provide power and climate control for the cab when parked. These idle control devices typically have a pay-back time of one to two years in fuel costs alone and can significantly reduce wear and tear on engines.
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EPA and NJ Schools Team to Reduce Pollution from 143 School Buses

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EPA and the Vineland School District in New Jersey announced the completion of a project under the Clean School Bus USA program to reduce emissions from 143 school buses. The completed grant project of tailpipe emission upgrades and anti-idling techniques will improve air quality for Vineland's 10,600 students. EPA provided a $180,000 grant to Vineland schools for this project in 2004. This completion announcement highlights Children's Health Month, which is celebrated in October.
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"Diesel retrofit programs like Clean School Bus USA help clean the air and protect our kids," said Alan J. Steinberg, EPA Regional Administrator. "The Vineland Board of Education has set a wonderful example for other New Jersey school districts as the first district to volunteer to reduce tailpipe emissions."
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Vineland installed pollution controls on 91 of the district's 143 buses and has instituted an anti-idling policy for all district buses. The pollution controls, called diesel oxidation catalysts and crank case filters, reduce harmful pollutants such as fine particles, hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide. Most school buses in the country are powered by large diesel engines that are not required to meet stricter pollution controls. Diesel emissions are proven to harm air quality and often lead to harm air quality and often lead to increased asthma rates and respiratory problems, particularly for children.
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"We were pleased to receive the Clean School Bus USA Grant from the EPA," said Joseph Callavini, Vineland School Transportation Manager. "It enabled the Vineland School District the opportunity to continue to provide quality transportation for our students and improve the quality of the air that we all breathe."
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Across the nation, school districts like Vineland's are realizing the environmental and health benefits of diesel upgrades. In Vineland's case, its engine improvements alone, not including anti-idling techniques, will reduce emissions of fine particles by at least 30 percent; hydrocarbons by at least 50 percent and carbon monoxide by at least 20 percent. The district also installed idling monitoring technologies in 20 buses in its fleet that allow supervisors to observe and improve fleet driving patterns.
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Schools everywhere can take Vineland's example and apply it to their districts. EPA estimates that the simple technique of idling reduction in New Jersey schools could remove 4,000 pounds of nitrogen oxides, 2,400 pounds of carbon monoxide, 600 pounds of hydrocarbons and 240 pounds of fine particles from the air each year. The anti-idling policy is economical in addition to being good for the environment. The district projects a fuel savings of 6,000 gallons per year by instituting the no idling policy and using the vehicle data monitors.
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Pollution control requirements for all diesel-powered vehicles continue to get tighter. By 2007, all diesel engines manufactured for buses and trucks will be 95% cleaner than those of most buses on the road today.
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EPA's Clean School Bus USA program gives grants and technical assistance to fleet owners so that they can reduce the exposure to diesel fumes of the 24 million children who ride school buses, and reduce the amount of air pollution these buses create. To find out more about the benefits of diesel vehicle upgrades, visit www.epa.gov/cleanschoolbus.
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Commercial Development Company Settles Violations Related to Storm Water Runoff

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The owners and operators of the Bristol Commerce Center have settled alleged Clean Water Act violations that occurred during construction work in 2004 at the center, the EPA announced. The center is a commercial development at in Bucks Co., Pa. In a consent agreement with EPA, Green Lane Properties LLC and company manager James Herring have agreed to pay a $15,000 penalty for failing to take required measures to reduce polluted storm water runoff from construction work on the site. Uncontrolled storm water runoff from construction sites often contains sediment, suspended solids, oxygen-demanding compounds and other pollutants. Under the Clean Water Act, operators of construction activities must obtain a permit from EPA or the state environmental agency before discharging storm water runoff into waterways. These permits include requirements for erosion and sediment controls and precautionary ôbest management practicesö such as spill prevention safeguards, material storage, and employee training. According to EPA, from April to Sept. 9, 2004, Green Lane Properties conducted land-clearing and related activities at the site without coverage of a state-issued storm water permit. On Sept. 9, 2004, the cited parties received permit approval, including an approved erosion and sedimentation control plan, from the Bucks County Conservation District. An EPA inspection of the construction site on Jun. 9, 2005 revealed that Green Lane had failed to fully implement required measures in the erosion and sedimentation plan, such as installation of a silt fence and soil stabilization. The settlement reflects the cited partiesÆ cooperation with EPA. As part of the settlement, the parties have neither admitted nor denied liability for the alleged violations. To learn more about EPAÆs storm water program, attend Environmental Resource CenterÆs Storm Water Training.
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EPA Cites Aluminum Recovery Plant for Failure to Comply with Emission Control Requirements

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EPA Region 5 has filed an administrative complaint against Remelt Services Inc. for alleged clean-air violations at the company's aluminum recovery plant in Cleveland, Ohio and proposed a $119,822 penalty.
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EPA alleges that Remelt failed to comply with federal dioxin and furan emission control requirements for its aluminum melting furnace. Specifically, EPA alleges that the company failed to meet requirements for proper operation, monitoring, planning, recordkeeping and notification.
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Remelt has 30 days from receipt of the complaint to file an answer and request a hearing. The company may request an informal conference with EPA at any time to discuss resolving the allegations.
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New DEP Web Site Makes it Easier to Find Information

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The Pennsylvania DEP has a fresh look with a new, simpler web site that will make it easier to navigate and obtain useful agency-wide information.á ôWeÆve worked to give Pennsylvania citizens simpler online access to information about DEP. People want to be able to find information easily and quickly," said DEP Secretary Kathleen A McGinty. ôPublic involvement is paramount to good policy-making and ensures that our state government truly is responsive to the people of Pennsylvania.ö
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ôDEP was one of the first state agencies to make its records and proceedings available to the public online. We have made finding documents and information easier than ever before.ö
The new site, features a single point of entry. The site is divided into four main areas of resource management û air, land, water and energy. Users who currently have bookmarked the site will need to enter the new address to re-establish their links.
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The center of the new homepage features seasonal information such as Governor Edward G. RendellÆs ôStay Warm PAö program and helpful information about PennsylvaniaÆs Land Recycling Program.á Users also will find links to other Pennsylvania environmental agencies and commissions, environmental laws (Pennsylvania Code and Pennsylvania Bulletin) as well as links to other hot topics.
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The left navigation panel of the homepage features quick links to frequently visited sites such as forms and publications, and a new feature, ôDEP Programs A-to-Z,ö which will help users easily locate the specific information they are seeking.
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The ôIn Your Neighborhoodö section links users to a particular region of the state and the news and information servicing that particular area. Users can find quick contacts for DEPÆs regional and district programs in this section.
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Brand new to the site is a bright, interactive, ôJust for Kidsö section featuring Carson P. Falcon, who helps younger visitors learn about a host of environmental topics such as energy, recycling, mining and, of course, PennsylvaniaÆs Peregrine falcons, which nest on the 15th Floor ledge of the Rachel Carson State Office Building in Harrisburg.
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ôJust for Kidsö also is where youths can build a wind tower, test their litter IQ or play the watershed game to learn more about PennsylvaniaÆs environment. The site also features dozens of interactive games and links to printable posters, stickers and coloring books.
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Missouri Offers Credits for Pollution-Saving Projects

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Energy efficiency and renewable energy projects in 36 eastern counties and the city of St. Louis can earn potentially profitable credits for implementing pollution-saving measures, according to the Missouri Department of Natural Resources Energy Center.
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Through the department's Missouri Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Set-Aside Program, projects that reduce the release of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) can earn credits that can then be sold to help power plants meet state and federal clean air requirements.
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NOx is a precursor of particulate matter and ground-level ozone. The goal of the program is to alleviate ozone problems in St. Louis and cities east that are downwind from Missouri. The credits apply to projects that reduce the amount of NOx created and released between May 1 and Sept. 30, which is considered the worst time of year for ozone.
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One NOx allowance, which has had recent market value of $2,500 to $3,000 each, is awarded for each ton of NOx that a project prevents from release into the environment. Eligible projects can include energy efficiency projects that reduce electrical usage; renewable energy projects that generate electricity from zero-emission renewable sources, such as solar, wind and landfill gas or digester gas; renewable energy projects based on burning biomass, such as wood and wood waste, energy crops such as switchgrass, and agricultural wastes such as crop and animal waste; and combined heat and power projects that use waste heat to generate electricity or other purposes.
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ADEM Files Air Quality Petition with EPA

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As part of its ongoing effort to ensure a cleaner environment, the Alabama Department of Environmental Management has sent a ôPetition for Reconsiderationö to the EPA. The petition calls for EPA to reconsider a preliminary decision that would enable the State of Georgia to avoid meeting the same air emissions requirements as Alabama and 21 other states.
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ADEM contends that sources of air pollution in Georgia may interfere with AlabamaÆs ability to maintain attainment of ozone standards statewide, particularly in the Birmingham area. The department asks EPA to require Georgia to impose a schedule for regulating emissions similar to Alabama and other southern states.
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ôWe are urging EPA to hold Georgia accountable to the same air emissions regulations that we have to follow,ö said ADEM Director Trey Glenn. ôIf Georgia is not compelled to meet these requirements AlabamaÆs environment and economy may suffer.ö
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ADEM states in the petition that EPA erred when it tendered an opinion on the ôlikelihood of success,ö of rule-making changes affecting Georgia without considering substantive comments submitted by ADEM and North Carolina concerning the problems this may cause in Alabama and other states. Under EPA rules, Alabama requires large emissions sources north of the 32nd parallel to comply with a permanent summertime (May 1 - Sept. 30) emissions cap while Georgia does not.
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ôADEM believes that a good environment is good for business,ö said Glenn. ôCreating a different set of standards between neighboring states is not beneficial to the environment or business.ö
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Environment Department Distributes Emergency Response Test Kits to New Mexico Drinking Water Systems

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The New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) Drinking Water Bureau will distribute 147 emergency response test kits in the coming months to selected drinking water systems to help evaluate and identify potential contamination following human intrusions.
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ôThese emergency response test kits are part of the Environment DepartmentÆs efforts to provide peace of mind when it comes to the stateÆs drinking water supply,ö NMED Secretary Ron Curry said. ôThere is nothing more fundamental than ensuring the safety of our public drinking water.ö
The test kits are designed based on EPA guidelines. Each kit can perform an airborne radiological screening and a water contamination assessment for chlorine residual, cyanide, pH, and conductivity.
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After an intrusion, water system managers can first use the radiation meter to screen the area for airborne radiological contaminants. If the site is safe, the managers can then test the water for cyanide, conductivity, PH and chlorine residual and compare the results to historical, baseline results. If there is a significant difference from baseline levels, water system contamination could be indicated.
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Physical evidence gathered at the site and the results of this initial testing could indicate what additional laboratory analyses should be performed, such as tests for heavy metals, volatile organic compounds, toxicity, etc., at a certified laboratory.
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Drinking water systems receiving a kit agree to assist other smaller, nearby water systems in case of an intrusion. This will provide water systems statewide with an initial, emergency testing capability in case of a potential water contamination incident anywhere in New Mexico.
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The New Mexico Department of Health (NMDOH), Epidemiology and Response Division, Office of Health Emergency Management (OHEM) as a part of an ongoing collaborative effort with NMED to protect public health provided funding for the purchase of the kits. OHEM creates and develops programs dedicated to awareness, prevention, preparedness, response and recovery for the public, first responders, medical personnel, hospitals, and special-needs populations within New Mexico.
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Intrusions to drinking water systems throughout New Mexico are a concern to the GovernorÆs Office of Homeland Security, New Mexico Department of Public Safety, the FBI Joint Terrorism Task Force, and local law enforcement agencies. In the past, intrusions have been the result of vandalism and not terrorists probing the system. However, drinking water system intrusions are taken seriously and each one is thoroughly investigated.
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For more information, contact Jerry Lewis, Drinking Water Bureau at (505) 222-9534 (jerome.lewis@state.nm.us) or Adam Rankin, NMED Communications Director at (505) 827-0314.
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What Does THAT Stand for?

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Even the most experienced environmental professional can run across an acronym that just doesnÆt ring a bell.á The EPA maintains a listing of abbreviations and acronyms that you may find helpful. Bookmark the EPA Glossary for quick reference.
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New Rule Will Accelerate Brownfields Development

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EPA Administrator Stephen L. Johnson announced the All Appropriate Inquiries rule Nov. 2 at a Brownfields Conference in Denver, Colo. The new rule establishes clear standards for environmental due diligence that will encourage more urban redevelopment.
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Johnson said "By making risk management less of a guessing game and more of a science, we are expanding the number of problem properties that will be transformed back into community assets." The All Appropriate Inquiries rule is expected to increase private cleanups of brownfield properties while reducing urban sprawl, affecting more than 250,000 commercial real estate transactions nationwide annually. The rule's process of evaluating a property for potential environmental contamination and assessing potential liability for any contamination at the property increases certainty of Superfund liability protection, and improves information about environmental conditions of properties.
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The rule was developed collaboratively with stakeholders representing diverse constituencies such as realtors, bankers, environmental interest groups, the retail industry, environmental justice organizations, and state, tribal and local governments.
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Since its inception in 1995, EPA's brownfields program has changed the way contaminated property is perceived, addressed, and managed. A brownfield is a property, the expansion, redevelopment, or reuse of which may be complicated by the presence or potential presence of a hazardous substance, pollutant, or contaminant. The brownfield program empowers states, communities, and other stakeholders in economic redevelopment to work together to assess, safely clean up, and reuse brownfields.
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Over the last decade the EPA's brownfields program has attracted more than $7 billion in public and private investments for the cleanup and redevelopment of brownfield properties in cities and towns across the nation, creating more than 33,000 thousand jobs. During this time, more than 7,000 properties have been assessed for environmental contamination.
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New EPA Due Diligence Standard of Questionable Value in Real Estate Transactions

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Jeff Civins, an environmental lawyer and leader of the Environmental Practice Group for Haynes and Boone LLP, warned that new due diligence rules approved Tuesday by the EPA burden real estate transactions without providing any significant benefit.
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The EPA's new "All Appropriate Inquiries" (AAI) requirements detail investigative steps to be taken when buying land that will let parties in the deal take advantage of defenses allowed under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), or "Superfund."á According to Civins, also an adjunct professor at the University of Texas School of Law, the rules laid out by the EPA will likely set a new industry-wide standard for minimum acceptable environmental due diligence, but that level of investigation will provide only very limited protections from liability and won't provide enough information to make an informed decision on the purchase of land.
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"Our view is that though the new standard is likely to set an industry practice, blind reliance on that standard is inadvisable," Civins said. "Prudent purchasers instead should consider each particular transaction in light of their own risk management objectives."
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Concerns with the new AAI Rule include:
  • áááááááááááááááá The defenses afforded by AAI protect only against Superfund liability and do not protect against liability under other federal environmental laws, state laws or actions under common law.
  • áááááááááááááááá Transaction-related defenses using AAI apply only to purchasers of land and provide no protections to purchasers in stock acquisitions.
  • áááááááááááááááá Investigations contemplated by AAI do not address numerous concerns that should be addressed as part of a meaningful environmental due diligence, including, among others, petroleum contamination, asbestos, lead based paint, lead in drinking water, wetlands, endangered species and indoor air quality.
  • áááááááááááááááá The requirements of AAI may adversely affect the timing and confidentiality of real estate transactions, as well as adding to their cost.
  • áááááááááááááááá Purchasers seeking to take advantage of the transaction-related defenses under AAI are still responsible for stopping and preventing releases of hazardous substances and preventing and limiting exposure to them.
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Mercury Species Fractionation and Quantification by Microwave Assisted Extraction

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EPAÆs Office of Solid Waste has developed a new technique for speciating mercury.á Method 3200 contains a sequential extraction and separation procedure that may be used in conjunction with a determinative method to differentiate mercury species that are present in soils and sediments.á It also provides information on both total mercury and various mercury species.
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Phytoremediation to Treat Persistent Organic Pollutants

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This document was prepared by Kristi Russell during an internship with the EPA. This report provides an overview of phytoremediation uses to treat media contaminated by persistent organic pollutants and demonstrate the potential for use of phytoremediation in developing and transitional economies.á
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Hazardous Waste Clean-up Podcasts

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Since 1998, EPAÆs Hazardous Waste Clean-Up Information (CLU-IN) web site has presented Internet Seminars covering a wide variety of technical topics related to hazardous waste characterization, monitoring, and remediation. For each seminar topic, we have selected the highest-quality offering for placement in our archives. More recently, the agency began offering these archives via podcast. For more information and to view upcoming live offerings, see http://www.clu-in.org/studio/.
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Trivia Question of the Week

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Which of the following was most recently listed by EPA as Universal Waste? a. Consumer electronic devices
b. Cathode ray tubes
c. Aerosol cans
d. Mercury-containing equipment
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Answers